Did you know that your body uses three micronutrients when working out?  These are carbohydrates, fats and protein.  The amount of each usage depends on your intake prior to working out. The body uses a larger portion of fat and protein if the glycogen storage is depleted.  However, if you are well fueled and consume carbohydrates during a long workout then your body will burn carbs and less protein.

Carbohydrates

Simple carbohydrates, such as refined grains, white bread, white rice, sugar, fruit juice and most breakfast cereals don’t have enough energy to fuel exercise. As a result they compel the muscles to use protein as energy, leading to loss of muscle tissues. Complex carbohydrates such as oatmeal, sweet potatoes and whole grains, on the other hand, provide slow-energy.  It means that they are stored in muscles as glycogen and help to power your workouts. When it comes to doing long cardiovascular workouts, it is best to start with a complex carbohydrate rather than a simple one. This is called carb-loading and helps to avoid muscle tissue loss.

Ultimate Pre-Workout Foods

Fruit Smoothies High- Protein Oatmeal Banana Apple with Peanut butter Yogurt Parfait

Protein

The breakdown of protein depends on the type of exercise and the intensity of exercise, but it is important to replenish the body’s protein after a workout to avoid muscle protein breakdown. Protein has essential amino acids that help to repair and rebuild muscles.  Having a protein bar containing at least 20 -40 grams of protein or a protein shake with the same amount will help to build new muscle tissue.  

Ultimate Post- Workout Foods

Egg omelette Protein shake Protein bars Tuna with toast Eggs with toast & avocado

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